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Prior to my adopted son's birth I was pumping 320 ml/day with the help of domperidone and other herbs. I have been exclusively breast feeding him since he was born (2 days ago). My question is will my supply continue to grow with him and his needs or should I expect to need to supplement via a lact-aid as he needs more. Due to the limited time we had prior to his due date I competed the expedited protocol. I read that unless you do the full protocol I will probably need to supplement, but how do I know when? Thanks!

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You will see that your child is still hungry after you get done breastfeeding or he/she will become fussy at the breast and it is an indication that they are not full but can't get any more milk from you. You can also weight the baby before and after you breastfeed and that will let you know how much they have had.

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Thank you Claudia. As of now when I finish feeding him I can still squirt milk from my breasts. I am also taking that as a good sign that he is full because if he wanted more he could continue to suck. After at least 1 feeding per day I pump with the hospital grade breast pump and get 1.5 ounces after he is done feeding.

I was hopeful that maybe since I started off with more than he needed that maybe my supply would grow with him. Do you think that could be the case? Or do you think that it won't grow fast enough or that I may max out at a certain point?

I like your idea of weighing him. In order to weigh him do I need a special newborn scale so that it is accurate? I am so happy with this experience, but didn't realize how nervous I would be about knowing if I am supplying him enough considering there is no way to measure.

So appreciative of your help,
Danielle

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Hi Danielle,

One way to help increase your supply is to pump after more feedings. I know it's a lot of work but your body works on supply and demand. The more you drain your breasts the more milk your body thinks it needs to produce. Do what you can, I know it's a lot of work.

As for the scale, you need something that can measure in ounces. Most baby scales are curves so the baby doesn't roll out. If you don't want to purchase one, you pediatrician may let you come to the office and weigh before and after a feed.

Your body may very well keep up with your baby's demands. It varies person by person. If you find that you aren't keeping up just know that babies go through growth spurts and it may take your body a little time to catch up. There is more to breastfeeding than the milk and I know it's easier said than done but don't beat yourself up if you have to supplement. You are doing everything you can.

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Claudia, thank you for the response - I really appreciate your expertise and feedback.

I completely agree that there is more than the milk to breastfeeding. I breastfed my adopted 3 year old daughter at birth however due to no lead time prior to birth she received almost all formula from the lact-aid at the breast. It was a beautiful experience even though I supplemented. I feel like that was almost easier because I knew how much formula to give her.

This time I know I had enough for a 1 week old prior to his birth because I measured everything after pumping. I just hope it continues to grow with him and didn't know if that was a good expectation or not. I will continue to pump after feedings as much as possible.

I am buying a scale that I can stand on and then stand on again with baby to see what the difference is before and after feedings... maybe that will work. I also like your suggestion of borrowing my pediatrician's scale.

I suppose that I just have to trust his signals. If I think he shows signs of being hungry then I will supplement and if not then I will know that I am giving him enough. I think regular weight checks will help my confidence in knowing I am providing him with enough breastmilk.

Again, thank you!


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